Blog - Raiz Invest

Bring to the table win-win survival strategies to ensure proactive domination. At the end of the day, going forward, a new normal that has evolved from generation.

Raiz market and economic update

16-10-19

From George Lucas, Raiz CEO

Downbeat earnings outlook for US stocks

In the US, Q3 earnings season kick offs in earnest and stocks are bracing for a third straight quarter of falling earnings, which would make it the longest streak in more than three years. S&P 500 companies are expected to report around a 4.1 per cent fall in earnings per share, following a 0.4 per cent drop in the second quarter and a 0.3 per cent dip in Q1.

It’s not uncommon for expectations going into earning seasons to be underestimated — so it’s possible that the current 4.1 per cent expectation could be beaten. Drivers for the drop in profits include rising labour costs and input costs as well as the rising US dollar, which serves to cut earnings as 40 per cent of S&P 500 companies’ sales come from overseas.

Energy and tech sectors are expected to be worst hit. Still, you wouldn’t know the dim outlook is around the corner from looking at the market right now. The S&P 500 stock index has remained near record highs since hitting an all-time high in July, supported by falling interest rates and hopes that peace could be brokered in the global trade war.

 

US consumer sentiment at three-month high

On a more upbeat note, this week saw the University of Michigan measure of consumer confidence rebound, with the survey hitting a three-month high of 96.0 for October. This bodes well for consumption growth and indicates that US consumers are not stretched at the moment.

On the political side, investors will be closely watching US impeachment proceedings, with polls showing support for impeaching US President Donald Trump rising above 50 per cent. The complaint against Trump centres on a phone call with Ukrainian counterpart Volodymyr Zelensky in which Trump is said to have asked for help investigating former Vice President Joe Biden.

There’s also the ongoing US-China trade stoush. Current talks have resulted in a “mini deal”, with China agreeing not to manipulate its currency and to buy more US agricultural goods. In return, the US would delay additional tariffs and ease restrictions on Chinese firms. While this appears a positive step, previous impermanent truces suggest that this one too may be unlikely to last long.

 

No breakthrough in Brexit

Across the Atlantic, the chances of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson getting a Brexit deal before the EU summit on 17 October have risen.

However, a “no-deal” Brexit at the end of October can’t be ruled out, but appears more unlikely given the “Benn Act” now legally obliges the Government to request a delay in such a scenario.

 

Aus unemployment tipped to remain steady

In Australia, this week we have the monthly unemployment report which is expected to show that the jobless rate stayed at 5.3 per cent in September.

Elsewhere, oil prices were on the rise again through the week following reports that an explosion set fire to an Iran-owned tanker near Saudi Arabia’s port city of Jeddah and caused an oil spill.

__________________

Important Note: The information on this website is provided for the use of licensed financial advisers only. The information is general advice and does not take into account any person’s particular investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this website.

Investors only: The information in this Document is confidential it must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person unless it is part of their statement of advice. The information may be based on assumptions or market conditions and may change without notice. This may impact the accuracy of the information. In no circumstances is the information in this Document to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of making a decision about a financial product or class of products.

General advice warning: The information contained in this Document is general information only. It has been prepared without taking account any potential investors’ financial situation, objectives or needs and the appropriateness of this information needs to be considered in that context. No responsibility or liability is accepted by Instreet or any third party who has contributed to this Document for any of the information contained herein or for any action taken by you or any of your officers, employees, agents or associates.

 

 

Raiz Rewards is real cash investments, not points.

Since inception, we have invested over $900,000 back into our customers’ Raiz Invest and Raiz Super accounts, with the average Raiz Reward of $5 invested back into a customer’s Raiz account per reward. With over 200 brands in Raiz Rewards, there’s a high chance we have the brands you already shop with online.

If you have answered this question from our “Chance to WIN – Quiz of the Month” email, you are now in the running to WIN one of 5 x $50 bonuses invested into your Raiz account. If not, simply check for an email titled “Chance to WIN: $50 bonus”, answer this question within the email and you will automatically be in the draw for the month!

 

What brands do we partner with?

We partner with many local and international brands across a variety of categories in our Raiz Rewards section. We currently have partners in fashion, food, travel, tech and more.

We’re also constantly on-boarding new partners so be sure to check the app and any communications about new partners. This means more opportunities for more cashback into your Raiz account.

Raiz Reward Partners

Keep an eye out for our new Raiz Rewards interface with an improved experience, including a search bar and categories, rolling out soon!

The new Raiz Rewards interface
The new Raiz Rewards interface

Start earning cashback through Raiz Rewards now in the Raiz mobile app or web app:

Tap to open Raiz Rewards on Mobile
Click to go to Raiz Rewards on Desktop

Don’t have the Raiz App?

Download it for free in the App store or the Webapp below:

download-raiz-app
Click to download the Raiz app

____________________

Important Information

The information on this website is general advice only. This means it does not consider any person’s investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this article to fully understand the benefits and risk associated with the Raiz product.

 

The information in this website is confidential. It must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person. The information is based on assumptions or market conditions which change without notice. This will impact the accuracy of the information.

 

Under no circumstances is the information to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of deciding about investing in Raiz.

Past return performance of the Raiz product should not be relied on for deciding to invest in Raiz and is not a good predictor of future performance.

Raiz market and economic update

01/10/19

From George Lucas, Raiz CEO

 

Stocks slump on Trump impeachment talk

This week saw US markets react badly after it became clear that Democrats would seek to impeach US President Donald Trump. Impeachment calls grew louder after Trump confirmed he held back aid to Ukraine but denied this was to provoke an investigation of former vice president Joe Biden.

Trump’s woes were compounded by rumours that his administration may seek to ban Chinese companies listing on US stock exchanges — further increasing tensions between the US and China.

However, it’s our view that both history and the particulars of the current situation suggest that the issue will ultimately matter little for the stock market.

 

UK Supreme Court: suspending parliament was unlawful

Across the Atlantic, the UK Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s decision to suspend parliament was unlawful. Johnson, who has since faced calls to resign, said he “profoundly disagreed” with the ruling but would nonetheless respect it.

The court ruling reduces the likelihood of a no-deal Brexit, but a lack of consensus in the UK Parliament on what happens next means that, unless a Brexit deal is struck, uncertainty will remain.

 

Eurozone economy continues slowdown

Elsewhere in Europe, recent economic data shows that the eurozone economies continue to slow.

In particular, the eurozone Composite Flash PMI fell to a 75-month low of 50.4 in September, consistent with GDP roughly flat-lining at the end of the quarter.

A breakdown of the data shows that the contraction in Europe’s manufacturing sector deepened. Worryingly, there were also signs that the weakness in manufacturing is leaking into services.

 

US Market Composite rises in September

US data releases were more upbeat. For instance, there was a small rebound in the Markit composite PMI in September, driven by improvements in both the manufacturing and services components. However, the uptick still leaves the index pointing to a slowdown in GDP growth.

There was also a small rise in US personal spending in August, suggesting that third-quarter consumption growth was around 2.6 per cent annualised — weaker than previously anticipated.

Additionally, US core durable goods orders last month rebounded and beat expectations, but even so business equipment investment seems to have stagnated in Q3. The upshot is that US GDP growth is expected to have slowed to 1.5 per cent annualised in the third quarter.

 

RBA tipped to slash rates

Locally, the Reserve Bank of Australia is expected to cut its policy rate to 0.75 per cent when it meets on Tuesday, following up its back-to-back rate cuts in June and July.

Looking ahead, August retail sales should give a better indication of how households are using the windfall of the Morrison government’s recent tax cut, with a strong 0.5 per cent month-on-month pick-up expected.

 

____________________

Important Note: The information on this website is provided for the use of licensed financial advisers only. The information is general advice and does not take into account any person’s particular investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this website.

Investors only: The information in this Document is confidential it must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person unless it is part of their statement of advice. The information may be based on assumptions or market conditions and may change without notice. This may impact the accuracy of the information. In no circumstances is the information in this Document to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of making a decision about a financial product or class of products.

General advice warning: The information contained in this Document is general information only. It has been prepared without taking account any potential investors’ financial situation, objectives or needs and the appropriateness of this information needs to be considered in that context. No responsibility or liability is accepted by Instreet or any third party who has contributed to this Document for any of the information contained herein or for any action taken by you or any of your officers, employees, agents or associates.

We are often asked from customers for more detail on our portfolio performance, however past performance is never a good predictor of future performance.

In saying this, it’s still always pleasing to deliver positive returns above the relevant benchmark. Raiz Invest Super invests in the same smart six diversified portfolios.

Raiz Portfolio Returns for FY 2018 – 2019
Open Raiz Super
Open Raiz Super

What are the Raiz Super Fees?

Our ambition is to give you an easy and affordable way to invest and build wealth for your future. Raiz Invest Super fees place it in the bottom 25% or lowest quartile for accumulation superannuation funds on the market (based on a SuperRatings review of over 440 superannuation funds). Please refer to the product disclosure statement for more detail.

It is also important to know that many super funds charge fixed costs. The more super funds you are a part of, the more you pay in fixed costs, regardless of the size of your balance in each fund. Put simply, by consolidating your super, you may only have to pay one set of fees.

Raiz Super makes the consolidation process easy, and can be done in minutes from within the Raiz app.

Do I have to select the same portfolio as my non-Super Raiz Invest?

No, you are able to select a different portfolio to your non-Super Raiz account.

Open Raiz Super
Rollover to Raiz Invest Super

Here are some resources to learn more about our portfolios and superannuation:

Investing in Stocks with Dividends – Distribution for FY 2020

Raiz Invest Super: Bringing Superannuation to your mobile phone

Why you don’t care about Future you

____________________

Important Information

The information on this website is general advice only. This means it does not consider any person’s investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this article to fully understand the benefits and risk associated with the Raiz product.

The information in this website is confidential. It must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person. The information is based on assumptions or market conditions which change without notice. This will impact the accuracy of the information.

Under no circumstances is the information to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of deciding about investing in Raiz.

Past return performance of the Raiz product should not be relied on for deciding to invest in Raiz and is not a good predictor of future performance.

17-09-19

From George Lucas, Raiz CEO

Global recession worries aren’t gone

This week, chatter about a potential global recession continued, despite the International Monetary Fund (IMF) saying that it is “far” from forecasting such an event, according to news agency Reuters. Indeed, although growth is slowing, economies are still expected to grow, just at a slow rate.

Interestingly, the stock market has not really factored in a recession or growth slowdown into current prices.  That’s clear if we look so far at September, which has not been volatile and has in fact seen the market move up, including the S&P500 again approaching all-time highs.

 

A possible volatile month for markets ahead

Still, although September can be volatile it is usually October where sharp market movement occur. Even so, there are signs to the contrary. For instance, the jobs market is strong globally and hence it is difficult to imagine a credit event that could cause a global financial crisis-style market event when employment is strong.

Similarly, robust employment means people are paying taxes, which can only help governments meet their obligations and boost infrastructure spending. Companies, meanwhile, are still hiring, with the latest NAB business conditions survey in Australia showing that companies’ intention to hire have improved, despite overall business conditions falling 2.0 points to +1.0 in August.

Secondly, investment committees around the world are having to make increasingly difficult decisions given the relative value of equities to cash and bonds and illiquid assets like property. Each investment committee will come to a different conclusion, but with cash rates expected to fall by two more cuts this year in the US, and many government bonds globally trading at negative rates it is a difficult decision where to allocate the cash once you sell out of equities.  It is possible for this reason that equities will remain at record levels.

 

Trump open to temporary China trade deal

Turning to the US, this week saw the Trump administration announce it was considering a “temporary” trade deal with China. Markets have been fixated on the trade war for much of 2019 and rising hopes for a deal have boosted risk appetite and expectations for global growth. Rallies in the Euro and emerging market currencies show just how much the market is focused on the ongoing trade stoush.

However, even if a temporary trade deal is stuck, there is no sign that the US and China are any closer to bridging their fundamental differences. Indeed, it is my view that the trade dispute could escalate further in the future. Given that, and with global growth likely to remain weak more generally, I still expect riskier assets to come under pressure soon – but I have been wrong so far.

 

US consumer prices tick up in August

Still in the US, this week saw the core CPI inflation rate there rise 0.3 per cent to an 11-year high of 2.4 per cent in August. The US Federal Reserve has worried that inflation has been rising too slowly, citing this issue as one of the reasons it cut interest rates in July.  The August data is very unlikely to stop the Fed from cutting interest rates again next week.

Meanwhile, US retail sales data showed that underlying sales growth is slowing but still growing, pointing to Q3 consumption growth still likely to be above 3 per cent annualised and overall GDP growth coming in at about 2 per cent annualised.

There was also a small rebound in the University of Michigan consumer confidence index. It rose to 92 in September from 89.8 in August, providing further reassurance that a severe consumer-led downturn is unlikely.

 

____________________

Important Note: The information on this website is provided for the use of licensed financial advisers only. The information is general advice and does not take into account any person’s particular investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this website.

Investors only: The information in this Document is confidential it must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person unless it is part of their statement of advice. The information may be based on assumptions or market conditions and may change without notice. This may impact the accuracy of the information. In no circumstances is the information in this Document to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of making a decision about a financial product or class of products.

General advice warning: The information contained in this Document is general information only. It has been prepared without taking account any potential investors’ financial situation, objectives or needs and the appropriateness of this information needs to be considered in that context. No responsibility or liability is accepted by Instreet or any third party who has contributed to this Document for any of the information contained herein or for any action taken by you or any of your officers, employees, agents or associates.

Photograph of river with rocky shore

It’s been almost 30 years since the severe economic downturn that then Treasurer Paul Keating famously described as “the recession we had to have”. Fortunately, the early 1990s recession lasted only a couple of years (at its worst) and, since 1992, Australia has enjoyed uninterrupted economic growth.

Even the global financial crisis couldn’t break Australia’s stride: though the dollar depreciated, equity prices fell, and unemployment rose slightly, we still managed to avoid a bona fide recession.

However, recent economic headwinds have caused investors to sit up and take notice. The ‘R’ word has reappeared, with some economists wondering if, after 28 years, Australia’s luck might finally be about to run out. In that context, savers may be wondering what they can do to stay ahead of a possible downturn.

Meantime, historically low interest rates from the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) means the hunt is also on for better returns. Finder research suggests that if both rate cuts have been passed on to deposit-holders, savers stand to lose $2.6 billion in interest.

This produces a complex economic environment for investing.

Here are three things to remember about building wealth in these multifaceted conditions.

 

Inflation is catching up

In a low-rate world, leaving cash in bank accounts or uncompetitive term deposits could mean that after inflation and tax, your money could be going backwards. RateCity shows interest rates for saving accounts as at 23 July 2019 after the Big 4 have passed on the RBA’s second cut:

Bank Product Base rate Max. rate
CBA Goalsaver 0.01% 1.15%*
West

pac

Life 0.60% 2.10%
NAB Reward Saver 0.11% 1.86%
ANZ Progress Saver 0.01% 1.95%

* For balances under $50K. CBA offers higher rates for higher balances.

When you consider the impact of taxation on the gross interest earned on these accounts, many savers will be earning less than the rate of inflation (1.3%).

To take an example, a person who is earning at the top tax rate (47%) and has $10,000 in an at-call account earning 2% p.a. interest will earn $106 after tax over a period of one year. Add in the effect of inflation (at 1.3%), and their $10,106 will be worth only $9,976 in real terms. Banks may be considered as safe as houses, but at least your house doesn’t get smaller every year.

If you’ve got cash in on-call accounts, consider why it’s there. Cash accounts are important for a rainy-day fund or for saving in the short term but may not generate wealth over the medium or long term. A failure to invest and instead leaving cash to languish in low-interest call or term deposits could, depending on your circumstances, be a guaranteed way to lose money in real terms.

And, if further cuts to cash rates eventuate, this could get worse. Minutes from the RBA’s July meeting indicate that the door is still open for further cuts: “The Board would continue to monitor developments in the labour market closely and adjust monetary policy if needed to support sustainable growth in the economy and the achievement of the inflation target over time.”

In a recent survey of RateSetter investors, 75% of respondents said that continued low bank interest rates contributed to their decision to invest their funds in RateSetter.

 

Diversify, diversify, diversify

Is it possible to responsibly pursue better returns in a low-interest environment, with some critics speculating a possible recession? The key could be diversification.

Build resilience into your portfolio by making sure it comprises a blend of shares, bonds, cash, property, and so on. Remember: the asset mix of your portfolio should be based on your risk tolerance, and not on whether markets rise or fall (which they will in a cyclical fashion anyway).

A mix of defensive, fixed income and growth assets within a portfolio such us with Raiz and RateSetter, can help mitigate risk and expand the prospects of reliable earnings.

 

Use fixed-income assets as a life-jacket

Government bonds were among the strongest performing assets during the last global recession, outperforming the ASX 200 despite seven months of negative returns. While rates of bond issuance decreased slightly, the more notable shift was towards shorter term bond terms.

There’s a good reason for the popularity of bonds even during a recession. Along with other forms of fixed-income assets, like consumer credit (i.e. personal loans), they tend to demonstrate high resilience and consistent returns. So, including bonds and other fixed-income investments in your asset mix can provide stability through economic downturns.

 

Guest post contributed by RateSetter

RateSetter is Australia’s largest peer-to-peer lender, that allows you to earn attractive returns by investing in a portfolio of consumer loans. To start investing with RateSetter you can register here. RateSetter are offering Raiz investors a $25 sign up bonus if you register before 30 September 2019.

 

Don’t have the Raiz App?

Download it for free in the App store or the Webapp below:

download-raiz-app
Click to download the Raiz app

Important Information

The information on this website is general advice only. This means it does not consider any person’s investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this article to fully understand the benefits and risk associated with the Raiz product.

The information in this website is confidential. It must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person. The information is based on assumptions or market conditions which change without notice. This will impact the accuracy of the information.

Under no circumstances is the information to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of deciding about investing in Raiz.

Past return performance of the Raiz product should not be relied on for deciding to invest in Raiz and is not a good predictor of future performance.

Globe on table representing global foreign exchange markets

Currency values are in constant flux, regularly going up and down in value. Five years ago, $1AUD was worth $0.90 USD. Today  it’s worth $0.68 USD.

However, this isn’t entirely random and there are factors that affect its performance. In this post we examine five factors that influence currency value.

1. Interest rates

Australia’s interest rates are set by the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA).

If interest rates are increased, holding that nation’s currency generates higher interest payments, creating more opportunities for profit growth. This draws in traders who try to buy it up, increasing the price of the currency.

Conversely, if the rates are decreased, opportunities for profit decrease and the currency is considered less valuable, causing people to try sell it off. With falling demands, the currency’s price falls.

2. Economic stability

A stable economy is perceived as low risk, attracting foreign investment. This demand increases the price of its currency.

In contrast, a weaker economy leads to investors losing confidence and withdrawing their investments, leading to the currency dropping.

3. Trade-Weighted Index

The trade-weighted effective exchange rate index (TWI), a common form of the effective exchange rate index, is a multilateral exchange rate index. It is compiled as a weighted average of exchange rates of home versus foreign currencies, with the weight for each foreign country equal to its share in trade.

When exports outweigh imports, an economy is said to have a ‘trade surplus’, strengthening the stability of said economy. The currency value rises as foreign consumers buy the currency to purchase exported goods.

On the other hand, when imports are greater than exports, an economy experiences a ‘trade deficit’. The country must sell its own currency to purchase the imported goods, leading to a reduction in currency value.

The TWI is a way of measuring the above in one simple number.

4. World events

Geo-political events, crisis, and impending election can all affect the strength of a currency based on how that affects the perception of a country’s stability. A positive event can attract foreign investors, with a rise in foreign capital increasing the value of the currency. A country in crisis can lead to a loss of confidence and depreciation of its currency value.

5. Government debt

Government debt by itself not necessarily a negative. It can help improve local infrastructure and creative economic growth. However, when it is too high, it can lead to inflation and currency devaluation.

When public debt is reduced, the economy becomes more stable and again attracts more investors, increasing the value of the currency. If public debt increases, the government may issue more currency, increasing the volume in circulation (known as quantitative easing). This dilutes the value of existing currency holdings, causing prices to drop.

Don’t have the Raiz App?

Download it for free in the App store or the Webapp below:

download-raiz-app
Click to download the Raiz app

Important Information

The information on this website is general advice only. This means it does not consider any person’s investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this article to fully understand the benefits and risk associated with the Raiz product.

The information in this website is confidential. It must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person. The information is based on assumptions or market conditions which change without notice. This will impact the accuracy of the information.

Under no circumstances is the information to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of deciding about investing in Raiz.

Past return performance of the Raiz product should not be relied on for deciding to invest in Raiz and is not a good predictor of future performance.

If you wait until age 40, how much will you have to deposit each month to reach the same amount?

Important Information

The information on this website is general advice only. This means it does not consider any person’s investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this article to fully understand the benefits and risk associated with the Raiz product.

The information in this website is confidential. It must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person. The information is based on assumptions or market conditions which change without notice. This will impact the accuracy of the information.

Under no circumstances is the information to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of deciding about investing in Raiz.

Past return performance of the Raiz product should not be relied on for deciding to invest in Raiz and is not a good predictor of future performance.

03-09-19

From George Lucas, Raiz CEO

Nervous truce in US, China trade war sees equity markets up

Firstly, looking at equities, the S&P500 closed last week back near the top of its recent range, with key resistance up near the 2,945 level and the index still within 5 per cent of its all-time high.

This suggests that — taking a step back from market volatility and US President Donald Trump’s recent trade war tweets — that many investors are still not overly worried about the outlook.

One possible explanation for the comparatively limited reaction in equity markets is that investors are still clinging to hopes that the trade war will blow over. However, this position doesn’t look particularly credible anymore given both China and the US have recently doubled down on their positions. An escalation in the trade stoush seems a much more likely outcome.

The second theory is that there are continued hopes among investors that the global economy will be fine, despite the trade war. Admittedly, its direct effects on the rest of the world are likely to be relatively small, but its indirect impact via confidence and investment remains unclear.

The problem with both these analyses is they miss the bigger picture in that the global economy has already lost momentum for reasons not directly related to US-China trade. Data out of Germany this week showing its economy contracting on weaker exports in Q2 is a stark reminder of this.

Powell uses Jackson Hole to hint at Fed rate cut

Global growth will probably remain weak even with some further easing of monetary policy by the US Federal Reserve later this year. Indeed, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell’s much-anticipated speech at the Jackson Hole conference hinted that the Fed will cut interest rates at its September meeting, but did little to clarify intentions beyond that.

As it stands, investors expect a further 100 basis points of cuts over the next 12 months, but those projections are almost certain to be revised down at the September meeting. It’s not only investors who have been disappointed by the Fed’s gradual approach, with President Trump repeatedly — and increasingly stridently — calling for much looser monetary policy.

It’s likely that the Fed will cut twice more this year largely on fears financial conditions could tighten if it disappoints market expectations. In saying that, the Fed has never cut by more than 75 basis points in a year outside an actual recession and the US is not currently in a recession.

Trump hints at support for more tax cuts

Trump — because he is not getting his rate cuts — is now said to be considering further tax cuts. But even if he keeps pushing for them, there’s good reason to think won’t happen. Remember, Democrats control the House of Representatives and won’t want to help Trump in an election year, while Republicans may also balk at increasing US fiscal debt that’s already near 5 per cent of GDP.

Australian construction work slumps

At home, the slowdown in Australia’s construction industries has ramped up, with new data showing a sharp decline in building work done in Q2. This suggests private investment fell further in the three months to June and lifts the downside risks to GDP growth.

Still on the construction sector, it’s unlikely that rebounding machinery and equipment investment in Australia will be enough to offset the current slump in construction activity. However, Australian firms have revised up their forecasts for future capital expenditure, so the drag from falling investment may ease gradually over the coming quarters.

Don’t have the Raiz App?

Download it for free in the App store or the Webapp below:

download-raiz-app
Click to download the Raiz app

Important Note: The information on this website is provided for the use of licensed financial advisers only. The information is general advice and does not take into account any person’s particular investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this website.

Investors only: The information in this Document is confidential it must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person unless it is part of their statement of advice. The information may be based on assumptions or market conditions and may change without notice. This may impact the accuracy of the information. In no circumstances is the information in this Document to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of making a decision about a financial product or class of products.

General advice warning: The information contained in this Document is general information only. It has been prepared without taking account any potential investors’ financial situation, objectives or needs and the appropriateness of this information needs to be considered in that context. No responsibility or liability is accepted by Instreet or any third party who has contributed to this Document for any of the information contained herein or for any action taken by you or any of your officers, employees, agents or associates.

Bondi Beach

Guest post written by Bondi Beauty

There are ways to still eat healthy and be fit, whilst saving money at the same time.

There’s a stigma attached to the idea that when you are fit and healthy you need to spend a lot of money to stay that way.

In-fact there are multiple ways to still save money without it effecting your healthy lifestyle.

Start by reviewing your health-related expenses

Grab a notepad and pen and start writing out all your health-related expenses. This includes what you spend on gym memberships, fitness gear, health foods and even paid health apps you might be using; or haven’t used since you purchased.

Now, go through each item you’ve written down and see where you are spending the most money.

Ditch unused gym subscriptions and fitness apps

Do you have a monthly subscription to an app which you aren’t even using, whilst spending too much money on a gym membership that you only go to once a week?

It might be time to find a gym with no contract commitments where you don’t have to pay monthly fees, and ditch the health and fitness app if you haven’t used it for more than a few months, or ever.

There are loads of great options like Class Pass which has the option to trial for free for the first week and then select a plan for as little as $11.30 a week for six classes a month. No lock in contracts or membership joining fees and you have the flexibility to join any Class Pass registered fitness group, from Pilates, yoga to weights and even boxing.

Not only will this save you money on gym memberships, it also offer a great variety of locations, classes and is an easy way to meet new people.

gym
A no lock-in contract gym membership could potentially save you money

Reduce how often you eat out

What about food? Are you eating out too much?

Eating out is great, but when you calculate what you’ve spent over a week of purchasing lunch and dinner nearly every day, you’ll mostly likely find you have spent more than what a week-worth of groceries would cost.

Reduce how many times a week you eat out and reserve it for special occasions only.

There are loads of affordable ways to eat at home. Buy produce which is in season and limit the amount of meat you buy. Start experimenting in the kitchen and get cooking.

If you cook extra, you can save the leftovers and use them for lunch meals to stop you buying out every day at work. Freezer options are a great alternative to those nights when you get home too late and don’t have time to cook.

Instead of booking a table at your favourite restaurant, why not invite your friends over for a cook fest or potluck dinner. Share what yummy inspirational and healthy recipes you have found with your mates and cook up a feast. It’s cheaper and you control what you’re eating.

Don’t spend too much on activewear

According to sports psychologist Dr. Jonathan Fader, when you purchase new activewear, it inspires you to work out harder. But that doesn’t mean you need a new outfit every week. Activewear can be costly.

All you need are a few key items and you can cleverly mix and match your outfits for every workout, and easily look like you have multiple outfits.

If you have excess gym accessories and activewear outfits you don’t need anymore, or have hardly used, why not sell them on eBay for some extra cash.

This is a great way to get a return on your health and fitness and have extra money on the side if you really want to treat yourself to brunch with your mates on the weekend.

Don’t have the Raiz App?

Download it for free in the App store or the Webapp below:

download-raiz-app
Click to download the Raiz app

Important Information

The information on this website is general advice only. This means it does not consider any person’s investment objectives, financial situation or investment needs. If you are an investor, you should consult your licensed adviser before acting on any information contained in this article to fully understand the benefits and risk associated with the Raiz product.

The information in this website is confidential. It must not be reproduced, distributed or disclosed to any other person. The information is based on assumptions or market conditions which change without notice. This will impact the accuracy of the information.

Under no circumstances is the information to be used by, or presented to, a person for the purposes of deciding about investing in Raiz.

Past return performance of the Raiz product should not be relied on for deciding to invest in Raiz and is not a good predictor of future performance.

Bitnami